Figure-ground
Screenshot: Yannick Hofmann

Figure-ground

Yannick Hofmann

Audiovisual Performance, 2020

Figure-ground deals with mental and cognitive processes oscillating between reflection and dissociation. As part of the performance an audiovisual collage is created in real-time. Both the visual and the sonic layer aim at creating a kind of pareidolia effect. Utilizing a real-time Canny edge detector, the outlines of a performer's fragmented self-portrait feed a Gray Scott Model of Reaction Diffusion. Its values control the parameters of an electro-acoustic soundscape which has been derived from electronic manipulation of natural sound objects, amplified small sounds and field-recordings. The audiovisual real-time performance system was developed by Yannick Hofmann during the 2020 Corona lockdown.

NCS_Hypogean City
Graphic: Dan Wilcox

NCS_Hypogean City

Ludger Brümmer, Yannick Hofmann, Dan Wilcox

Sound Installation, 2019

Matera, Italy is considered to be one of the oldest cities in the world with distinctive cave-like dwellings carved out of limestone. Called "Tufo" by inhabitants of the region, this soft stone consists mainly of calcium carbonate, a chemical compound of the elements calcium, carbon, and oxygen, laid done as sediment millions of years ago. Over time, spaces have been hollowed out through the flow of water and human hands, extending back into a layered history. NCS_Hypogean-City is a multi-room sound installation of spatialized electroacoustic miniatures. Its textual characteristics and dramaturgical progressions are built upon the sonification of the area's timeline, geological data, and both the symbolic and numerologicalic aspects of calcium, carbon and oxygen: Ca (20), C (6), O (8). Through the dynamic placement of small-scale loudspeaker systems new (sound) connections are created within the space that artistically reflect Matera's geologically unique setting and stimulate the cave acoustics of the Casa Cava. The multi-room sound installation NCS_Hypogean-City was exclusively developed in 2019 for IN VITRØ - artificial sønification as part of the Interfaces Project, co-funded by the Creative Europe Programme of the European Union.

Three sonifications of ink drawings by Dieter Appelt
Screenshot: Galerie Thomas Schulte

Three sonifications of ink drawings by Dieter Appelt

Yannick Hofmann

Sound, 2019

For the exhibition Sound Fields Yannick Hofmann has set three graphic scores by Dieter Appelt to music (27b, 34 and 52). As part of a computer-based process, Appelt's pen drawings were first digitized and transformed into a grayscale image with inverted colors. Turned counterclockwise by 90°, these digital copies have been transferred to a right-handed Cartesian coordinate system, on whose X-axis the time and on whose Y-axis the sound frequency spectrum are displayed. The graphic score was then read out by the computer program along the X-axis and a digital waveform was synthesized. The positions of pixels on the Y-axis at time X correlate with the frequencies (pitches) of the synthesized oscillations and the light-dark values of the pixels correlate with their amplitude (volume): the brighter the pixels, the louder the amplitude of the oscillations. Sounds, tones and noises are composed of frequencies whose audible spectrum ranges from about 20 Hz to 20000 Hz (20 kHz). A spectrum from 20 Hz to 1 kHz (low bass, overbass, fundamental and midrange) was selected for the setting of the three scores, covering the frequency range from the lowest note of an electric bass to the highest note of the highest brass instrument, the trumpet.

Next City Sounds: Interfaces
Photo: © ZKM | Karlsruhe

Next City Sounds: Interfaces

Yannick Hofmann, Marco Kempf, Benjamin Miller, Barbara Nerness, Sebastian Schottke, Dan Wilcox

In-situ Performances: KITeratur, Lasse-Marc Riek, Lintu, No Input Ensemble

Telematic Event, 2018

As part of the 20th KAMUNA (Karlsruhe Museum Night) on August 4, in-situ performances will take place at three locations in Karlsruhe: ßpace, Halo and the Kaiserstraße pedestrian zone will be connected to the ZKM via an outgoing audio data stream. In ßpace the artist Lasse-Marc Riek will condense naturalistic field recordings, noise and soundscape recordings into a live collage. Lintu + Røyk perform with modular synthesizers and broadcast live electronica from the artist-run space Halo in the eastern city of Karlsruhe. The members of KITeratur will present their participatory performance SYNONiMUS in the pedestrian zone in Kaiserstraße, while the No Input Ensemble will perform in the subspace of the ZKM under the blue cube. At the ZKM, all incoming signals are fanned out like a kaleidoscope and artistically processed in a sound installation by Yannick Hofmann, Marco Kempf, Ben Miller, Sebastian Schottke and Dan Wilcox in the cube, in the cube anteroom and in the underground car park at the ZKM. Next City Sounds: Interfaces is part of the EU project Interfaces (EU funding program Creative Europe) and the Karlsruhe Museum Night 2018.

Glasshouse. See and Be Seen
Photo: Anatol Serexhe

Glasshouse. See and Be Seen

Yannick Hofmann

Installation, 2013/2018

US social media mogul Mark Zuckerberg already announced in 2010 that privacy was no longer a social norm today. Eight years later, the Cambridge Analytica data scandal has impressively revealed that private data can illegally become the starting point for data-driven political or commercial campaigns that can have a huge impact on society. Glasshouse. See and Be Seen illustrates the fine line between privacy and publicity and lets visitors experience its dissolution through an unintentional crossing of the border: Within the exhibition situation, a comfortably furnished room suggests privacy to the visitors. However, a subtly hidden photo trap reacts to the entry of the visitors and the photos are uploaded in real time into the picture gallery of a social media profile. A recognition algorithm automatically pixels faces and makes people unrecognisable. During the entry the visitors recognize their uploaded picture on a screen placed opposite the door.

Glasshouse. See and Be Seen
Design: Fiona Marten

Monocause. Dialectics of the Post-Truth Era

Yannick Hofmann

Interactive Audiovisual Installation, iOS app, 2017

It seems as though in the post-truth age processes of public opinion formation are following more and more the exclusive disjunction of mathematical logic ("either … or …"). Whether in the context of the US presidential election campaign of 2016, so-called Brexit, or the Hamburg G20 protests, post-truthism and false dilemmas polarize society and suggest that only extremes exist that are opposed to each other (for example like/dislike, black/white, rich/poor). For Monocause. Dialectics of the Post-Truth Era, excerpts from various texts and speeches were collected – including, for example, the doctrine of US President Bush in the 2000s ("you’re either with us, or against us"). With a swipe, museum visitors can express sympathy with or resentment towards people from A like Adorno to Z like Žižek. The swipe gesture thus becomes the equivalent of the "thumbs up" or "thumbs down" hand gestures of Roman emperors at the circus. The interface is based conceptually and in its design on the famous dating app Tinder.

Tele(re)vision
Photo: Oliver Boualam

Tele(re)vision

Yannick Hofmann

Interactive Installation, 2014

The interactive installation Tele(re)vision reverses the unidirectional communication principle of television and gives recipients the opportunity to take on a more active role. To do this, they can grab everyday objects lying on the floor and throw them into the hollowed-out body of an analogue tube television. At the same time, they trigger fragments of a musique concrète-like composition for fixed media.

Glasshouse. See and Be Seen
Photo: Oliver Boualam

Mixer Tap

Yannick Hofmann

Interactive Installation, 2011

Mixer Tap takes McLuhan's idea of hot and cool media literally and reinterpretes it based on the concept of Hi–Fi/Lo–Fi by Canadian sound researcher Murray Schafer. Hot media is represented by a Hi–Fi–soundscape (according to Schafer's terminology a detailed, transparent listening event), cool media by a Lo–Fi–soundscape, in which sounds and noises get mixed and merged indistinguishably. An ordinary bathroom fitting functions as interface. The recipient creates the mix, as Hofmann takes up McLuhan's theory, seasons it with Schafer, and connects both masterminds' elements within a sound object. Hi–Fi/Lo–Fi, hot/cool: a ruthless interpretation of both's theories, which can lead to light bulb moments as well as to headshaking.

*1988 in Offenbach am Main (DE), lives and works in Karlsruhe (DE)

Yannick Hofmann is an artist and curator. He is the Deputy Head of ZKM | Hertz-Lab and teaches at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). Using methods of the maker and hacker scene, his conceptually motivated artistic work is often concerned with aspects of social disruption or technological bias. It has been internationally presented in Europe, Russia, North America, Southeast Asia and India.

Photo: Fiona Marten
Photo: Fiona Marten

Information according to § 5 TMG / Responsible for the content according to § 55 Abs. 2 RStV:
Yannick Hofmann
Reinhold-Frank-Straße 24
76133 Karlsruhe
Germany
Phone: +49(0)72181001675
E-Mail: contact@yannickhofmann.de

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